A coffee ceremony (Amharic: ቡና ማፍላት, translit. buna maflat) is a ritualized form of making and drinking coffee. The coffee ceremony was first practiced in Ethiopia and became part of Eritrean culture as Eritrea was once part of Ethiopian . There is a routine of serving coffee on daily basis mainly for the purpose of getting together and having a little talk with relatives , neighbors and etc. If coffee is politely declined then most likely tea (shai) will be served.
The ceremony is typically performed by the woman of the household and is considered an honor.[1] The coffee is brewed by first roasting the green coffee beans over an open flame in a pan .[2][3] This is followed by the grinding of the beans, traditionally in a wooden mortar and pestle.[3] The coffee grounds are then put into a special vessel which contain boiled water and will be left on an open flame a couple of minutes until it is well mixed with the hot water.[2] After grinding, the coffee is put through a sieve several times.[3] The boiling pot (jebena) is usually made of pottery and has a spherical base, a neck and pouring spout, and a handle where the neck connects with the base.[3] The jebena also has a straw lid. 
Source: Wikipedia
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Ethiopian Coffee Time

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A coffee ceremony (Amharic: ቡና ማፍላት, translit. buna maflat) is a ritualized form of making and drinking coffee. The coffee ceremony was first practiced in Ethiopia and became part of Eritrean culture as Eritrea was once part of Ethiopian . There is a routine of serving coffee on daily basis mainly for the purpose of getting together and having a little talk with relatives , neighbors and etc. If coffee is politely declined then most likely tea (shai) will be served.
The ceremony is typically performed by the woman of the household and is considered an honor.[1] The coffee is brewed by first roasting the green coffee beans over an open flame in a pan .[2][3] This is followed by the grinding of the beans, traditionally in a wooden mortar and pestle.[3] The coffee grounds are then put into a special vessel which contain boiled water and will be left on an open flame a couple of minutes until it is well mixed with the hot water.[2] After grinding, the coffee is put through a sieve several times.[3] The boiling pot (jebena) is usually made of pottery and has a spherical base, a neck and pouring spout, and a handle where the neck connects with the base.[3] The jebena also has a straw lid.
Source: Wikipedia

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